The tragic way Singapore Airlines victim Geoff Kitchen’s wife told of her husband’s death

The tragic way Singapore Airlines victim Geoff Kitchen’s wife told of her husband’s death

Tragic new details have emerged about how the wife of Geoff Kitchen, who died on a horror Singapore Airlines flight, learned of her husband’s death.

Australian journalist Sophie Elsworth analyzes the “terrifying” turbulence that killed a man on a Singapore Airlines flight. A 73-year-old man died when a Singapore Airlines flight from London to Singapore experienced extreme turbulence. Many others have been taken to hospital, some of them seriously injured. “Whenever you encounter turbulence, it’s sometimes very scary, but you never expect it to end badly,” Ms Elsworth told Sky News presenter Andrew Bolt. “Fortunately, it didn’t end as bad as it could have been.”

Geoffrey Kitchen, 73, died of a suspected heart attack on flight SQ321 from London to Singapore when the Boeing 777-300ER encountered horrific turbulence at 11 a.m. on Monday (local time).

His wife, Linda Kitchen, suffered serious injuries when 211 passengers and 18 crew were catapulted into the air after the plane suddenly fell 2,000 meters in about three minutes during breakfast.

Linda Kitchen and her late husband Geoff were on the Singapore Airlines turbulence flight. Image: supplied.

British Geoff Kitchen, 73, died on a Singapore Airlines flight after being hit by strong turbulence. Image: Supplied

The 51-year-old couple from Thornbury, Gloucestershire, had embarked on a dream six-week trip before their flight was forced to make an emergency landing in nearby Bangkok, Thailand, at 3.45pm local time.

Mrs Kitchen was in intensive care on Wednesday morning when the mother of two was informed of her husband’s death in the disaster, the UK’s Sun reported.

“They gave her the tragic news… They were such a devoted couple, you can’t imagine what it must be like for her,” said a friend of the couple’s family.

“She was dizzy from the painkillers and they are going to do a second examination.

“She has spinal and shoulder injuries. I think she was unconscious when they took her off the plane.”

Steve Dimond, who lives with his wife Jill a few doors down from Geoff and Linda on a quiet, leafy cul-de-sac in Gloucestershire, said they were “really upset” by the death of their neighbour.

“My wife is upstairs crying,” Dimond said.

“He (Geoff) was a really nice guy. I last saw them on Sunday night and my wife saw them leave on Monday.”

The Thornbury resident said his neighbors had embarked on a “big holiday” to “Singapore, Indonesia, Japan and Australia” and had a “son and a daughter”.

It is understood that Geoff and Linda’s children in the UK were unable to obtain information about their parents until Thai authorities brought in translators to help worried relatives caught up in the plane tragedy.

The grandmother spoke to her son Stuart from her hospital bed.

Travelers hit their heads on the plane roof or overhead luggage compartments, causing serious head injuries and bruising. Image: Supplied

Loading insert…

Stuart and the couple’s daughter Anna Proctor remain in their homeland, although it is understood plans had been made for them to fly to Bangkok.

“We are actively contacting their families and loved ones, where possible, to provide updates and offer necessary support,” Singapore Airlines said.

Company chairman Peter Seah said he and the board expressed their “deepest condolences” to the Briton’s loved ones and stressed that he would support the passengers and crew who were traumatized by the mid-air incident.

“I assure all passengers and crew members who were on board the aircraft that we are committed to supporting them during this difficult time,” he said in a statement.

Tragedy occurred when the plane fell into an air pocket over the country of Myanmar, with only a couple of hours left of its long journey from London.

The force of the turbulence caused dozens of passengers, who were not wearing seat belts, and the crew to be thrown into the air.

Travelers hit their heads on the plane roof or overhead luggage compartments, causing serious head injuries and bruising.

Affected Australians have steadily returned to the country, with the first group arriving home on several flights to Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane.